What Were Dalmatians Bred For? History Of The Dalmatian


Although the exact origins of the breed are somewhat unknown, the Dalmatian is a hunting dog that has also seen use as a coach dog. It is also known as a firehouse dog because of its use accompanying firefighters on jobs and around firehouses.

It is believed to have originated by breeding pointers with certain Great Danes and became especially popular in the 18th century. Although still sometimes used as a hunting or working dog, today’s Dalmatian is just as likely to be found as a family companion, entered into kennel club competitions and other exhibitions, and, of course, on TV and in movies.

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The Origins

14th Century

The precise origins of the breed are unknown and somewhat contested but it is believed that they first originated in Croatia and Austria and were first used as hunting dogs. The Bishop of Dakovo, Peter, talked of a breed that was white with dark spots, referring to it as the Canis Dalmaticus, in 1374 and this is believed to be the first mention of the breed that we now know as the dalmatian.

However, there are paintings that originate back to Ancient Egypt showing white dogs with black and brown speckles so it could be even more ancient than many believe.

19th Century Coach Dogs

dalmatian face
Image Credit: Rebecca Scholz, Pixabay

It was during the Regency period, at the start of the 19th Century, that the Dalmatian really became popular. It was seen as a sign of nobility and was considered a status symbol to have a dalmatian accompanying and protecting a coach. The Spotted Coach Dog would have also been used to protect the stables at night. It was a hard-working dog that, once given the task of guarding and accompanying, it was almost impossible to distract it.

In 1890, the first Dalmatian Club was established in England and its distinctive and beautiful coat saw the dog become very popular in the UK.

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Other Historical Uses Of The Dalmatian

Whatever the origins of the dog, it has proven popular for many purposes. As well as guarding and protecting coaches, the Dalmatian has been used as a guard dog, protecting its owners and their belongings. It was also considered a skilled hunting dog and was especially popular for its ability to flush out birds and retrieve them once downed. The dog also has a very strong hunting instinct, which is still prevalent even in today’s domesticated variation of the breed.

Another, possibly unfortunate use of the dog has been as a circus dog, where its unusual markings meant it was seen as a spectacle and considered exotic and unusual.

These same markings have made it popular as the subject of paintings, poems, and, of course, in cartoons and films like 101 Dalmatians.

Possibly one of the best-known uses of the Dalmatian has been as a firehouse dog. As well as being a mascot for the firehouse, the dog would also guard firefighting equipment and it would run ahead of horse-drawn firefighting carriages to clear a path and ensure that the horses could get through. Still today, the dog can be found being used as a mascot in some firehouses across the world.

The Dalmatian Today

dalmatian standing on snow
Image Credit: Rebecca Scholz, Pixabay

Today, the Dalmatian is less likely to be used for its guarding and protecting and more likely to be featured in exhibitions and competitions. Its distinctive markings, and breed standards, make it popular, but so too do its keen stance and proud appearance.

Although it retains some hunting instinct and an independent nature, the Dalmatian also makes a good family dog or companion, and many owners go on to own and keep a succession of the dogs because they fall in love with the breed’s temperament and courage.

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Conclusion

The Dalmatian is one of the most instantly recognizable of all dog breeds, thanks to its white coat and dark spots. It has featured in TV and film, regularly appears in global canine competitions, and it can make a great family pet, especially with those families willing to give it regular and hard exercise. While this is some way from the dog’s original duties as a carriage or coach dog, it remains a very popular and noble breed.


Featured Image Credit: skeeze, Pixabay



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